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Comments

Joan

So you're not planning on doing any hunting or fishing on this trip? No slingshots or fishing poles? You could carry far less food if you hunted/fished/foraged along the way, but perhaps you're on a forced march?

Joan

Never mind, I just read your objectives. Don't know why you're doing it like that though...

Lost in Yemen

Why are you eating so little food the first week? If you ate a little more at the beginning you would be able to lighten the pack quicker and save your "fat" calories till a little later in the hike, rather than consuming the majority of them in the first 10 days of the hike?

Hey Guys...seems to me me you could save a few nanograms if you left off the week on the ration labeling...I mean isn't day 12 obviusly week 2 ?

Craig Tenney

First, excellent work on this and everything else here. Second, the material balance at the end of the "How much to take" section didn't quite balance with my interpretation of the given information. It seems to me that water weight and final %fat were accounted for in an inconsistent manner. I've pasted below a text copy of a simple spreadsheet I put together using the given information. (I apologize if the formatting gets garbled. I also realize it would make far more sense if you could see the actual spreadsheet.) Initial results suggest that ~64k Calories are available to a 155# person going from 16% to 8% body fat. Neglecting water loss is a more conservative assumption and lowers available Calories to ~55k, which is still much higher than the 36k cited above. Accounting for glycogen stores would probably result in more accurate results.
******************
body wt, lb % fat
start 155 16%
finish 113.8 8%

fat protein water sum
Cal/g 7 4 0
Cal/lb 3178 1816 0
wt loss ratio 8 4 9 21
loss fraction 38% 19% 43%

pounds lost 15.7 7.8 17.7 41.2
Cal burned 49883 14252 0 64135

notes:
1) Glycogen depletion is neglected, but may play a significant role in lost water weight.
2) Final %fat should probably be calculated as if glycogen/water weight has not been lost. (i.e. The %fat of a dehydrated person w/o glycogen stores is artificially high.)

mike wilke

in regard to the daily caloric intake summary:

don't those numbers add up to 56.1# of food, not 42.8?

thanks, mike

mike wilke

in regard to the daily caloric intake summary:

don't those numbers add up to 56.1# of food, not 42.8?

thanks, mike

joe

I love this trek and everything about it, I only wish I had done it instead. The food stuff is great, i enlisted the help of a dietician to help me plan for my up-and-coming CDT trip. thanks for the notes -Joe

Charlie Bader

Ryan- I really enjoyed reading this page. In many ways it reminded me of my father, who is an avid backpacker/hunter. He passed a lot of knowledge on to me: "Don't bring diet food!"
Have you ever considered eating the local food up north? The Alaskan Natives have been trekking (sometimes in winter) the Arctic for thousands of years, and they also travel light. Next time you are in Kaktovik, make some friends and trade (you can't buy this stuff) your Pringles for walrus/bearded/spotted seal oil (252 cal/oz.), dried herring packed in oil (137 cal/oz.), smoked chinook (159 cal/oz.) and fish/berry/seal oil Agutuk (99 cal/oz.). All are strongly anti-inflammatory, suprisingly low in cholesterol and you'll get some protein to help repair all that muscle. You have not lived until you've drank a shot of pure salmon oil (253cal/oz.) Yummy! http://www.nutritiondata.com/foods-alaska000000000000000000000-1.html

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What is Arctic 1000?

    In June 2006, adventurers Roman Dial, Ryan Jordan, and Jason Geck will attempt the first unsupported trekking traverse of America's most remote wilderness - Alaska's western North Slope and Brooks Range - a distance of 1,000 km (600 miles).
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